Archived Workshop Reports

The workshops listed here are are 5 years and older. Go to Workshop Reports to view workshops from the last 5 years.

2013

From Tank to Bedside: Zebrafish and Translational Research

October 28, 2013 to October 29, 2013

On October 28 and 29, 2013, the NIH convened a workshop entitled, “From Tank to Bedside:  Zebrafish and Translational Research” on October 29 – 30, 2013 at the Natcher Conference Center on the NIH Campus.  The objectives of the Workshop were: 1)  to provide input to the NIH on the current status of projects and technologies that directly inform studies related to human health using the zebrafish as an animal model; and 2) to provide advice to the NIH on initiatives that can enhance the use of zebrafish in translational research.  For the purpose of the workshop, translational research was defined broadly as investigations that are directly related to aspects of human disease, with the eventual goal of finding the cause of illness and treating it in the clinic.

Animal Models and Personalized Medicine

October 28, 2013 to October 29, 2013

On October 28 and 29, 2013, the NIH convened a workshop entitled, “Animal Models and Personalized Medicine.” The goals of the workshop were: 1. to discuss the status of human personalized genomics and the use of comparative functional genomics in other organisms to interpret patient information for clinical use; 2. to review the current status of the development and use of the personalized animal models based upon a variety of animal species; 3. to evaluate the potential use of personalized animal models for translational medicine applications and; 4. to develop the consensus and provide recommendations to the NIH regarding the potential strategic initiatives which would make a valuable contribution to the field.

14th Annual Merial-NIH National Veterinary Scholars Symposium “Comparative Medicine: Meeting Global Needs"

August 1, 2013 to August 4, 2013

Over 600 participants attended the 13th annual Merial‐NIH Symposium at the Kellogg Center, East Lansing, Michigan, hosted by the College of Veterinary Medicine at Michigan State University. Over 435 veterinary students from 36 veterinary schools, including 27 from US institutions, three from Canada, two from the Caribbean, three from France, and one from Holland, were represented at the symposium as well as veterinary students training at NCI, NIH. Other participants included University Program Directors as well as representatives from the NIH, Merial, Burroughs Wellcome, the Association of American Veterinary Colleges, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Students attending the symposium included veterinary students participating in the summer research program, DVM/PhD students and postdoctoral veterinarians in research training programs. The over‐riding theme of the symposium was “Comparative Medicine: Meeting Global Needs”.

Evaluation of the Special Emphasis Research Career Award (SERCA) Program (K01)

March 7, 2013

The Division of Comparative Medicine (DCM), within the Office of Research Infrastructure Programs (ORIP) / DPCPSI / NIH-OD, funds Special Emphasis Research Career Awards (SERCAs) in Pathology and Comparative Medicine. These K01 awards are intended specifically to assist graduate veterinarians who have experience in animal/comparative research to become independent investigators in areas related to biomedical science. Since its inception more than 30 years ago, an independent evaluation of the program has not been done. Therefore, in 2012 the DCM assessed the extent to which the program is achieving its original goals.

2012

Summary of the Improving Animal Models for Regenerative Medicine Workshop

May 23, 2012 to May 24, 2012

On May 23 and 24, 2012, the NIH convened a workshop, entitled "Improving Animal Models for Regenerative Medicine." The goals of the workshop were to: 1) review the current status and benefits of the use of animal models for cell-based regenerative medicine, with the eventual goal of moving these techniques into clinical practice; and 2) for subject matter experts to provide advice to the NIH regarding potential initiatives that will advance the field.

Summary of the 13th Annual Merial-NIH National Veterinary Scholars Symposium “Comparative Medicine: The Key to Translation”

August 2, 2012 to August 5, 2012

Summary of Evolution of Disease Models Resources, the Ninth Comparative Medicine Resource Directors Meeting

August 15, 2012 to August 16, 2012

“Evolution of Disease Models Resources,” the Ninth Comparative Medicine Resource Directors Meeting was held in Bethesda, Maryland. Principal Investigators were invited to attend if they held resource-related grants or contracts from the Division of Comparative Medicine, Office of Research Infrastructure Programs, Division of Program Coordination, Planning, and Strategic Initiatives, Office of the Director. This biannual meeting provides a forum to exchange information among grantees and extramural program staff members from many NIH Institutes and Center and the NIH Office of the Director, and to highlight activities of the DCM-supported resource centers. At this meeting, 26 presentations and more than 50 posters highlighted aspects of “Strengthening DCM Resources’ Impact in Biomedical Research,” “Strategies for Linking Genotypes with Phenotypes,” and “Promoting a Resource.”

Next Generation Animal Models Targeting Personalized Disease Phenotypes

September 6, 2012

In the “pre-genomic” era, efforts to functionally annotate human and animal genomes provided information regarding the structure and biological activity of individual genes, leading to a better understanding of the genetic basis of a variety of human monogenic diseases. In the “post genomic” era, sequencing of entire genomes and development of complex bioinformatic tools such as the human HapMap have revealed specific alleles associated with monogenic as well as complex diseases in humans. One of the most frequently used approaches to verify that particular genetic changes lead to human disease is to recapitulate and test these changes in genetically-modified animal models.

2010

Summary of the Neotropical Primates in Biomedical Research Workshop

September 22, 2010 to September 23, 2010

The Neotropical Primates in Biomedical Research Workshop was held September 22 – 23, 2010, at the Lister Hill auditorium (Bldg. 38A) on the NIH main campus in Bethesda, Md. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an update on the current use of neotropical (new world) primates in biomedical research and insights into their potential future use and demand. Overall, there were 25 presenters. There were a total of 103 participants, including NIH-supported extramural and intramural researchers, and NIH program and review staff.

Realizing the Scientific Potential of Transcriptomics in Aquatic Models

September 19, 2010

The central purpose of this workshop was to assess the current nature and immediate future of transcriptomic expression profiling resources that may advance the utility of aquatic models to address relevant issues in human disease research. This workshop blended a diverse group of aquatic biomedical model experts to assess the scientific potential of utilizing transcriptomics in aquatic models of human disease and to evaluate mechanisms to overcome the substantial hurdles for individual labs to capitalize on the new methods.

Data Annotation and Curation of Mouse Strains at the Mutant Mouse Regional Resource Consortium

September 9, 2010

This workshop of the representatives from each of the MMRRC repositories and ICSC was held to coordinate efforts and ensure extensive and accurate curation of strain information for all of the accepted MMRRC strains in the repository. The central purpose of the meeting was to discuss the significant number of newly deposited strains that are requiring joint efforts for the fast and proper curation in order to make the strain information available to the requesting investigators through the ICSC search interface.

Summary of the Eighth Comparative Medicine Resource Directors Meeting

May 10, 2010 to May 11, 2010

The Eighth Comparative Medicine (CM) Resource Directors Meeting was held May 10 – 11, 2010, at the Doubletree Hotel in Bethesda, Md. Principal Investigators were invited to attend if they held resource-related grants or contracts from NCRR's (now ORIP's) Division of Comparative Medicine. This biannual meeting provided a forum to exchange information among grantees and extramural program staff members from many NIH ICs and all four divisions of NCRR, and to highlight activities of the DCM-supported resource centers. At this meeting, 33 presentations and 32 posters highlighted aspects of Translational Medicine, High-Throughput Technologies, and Reinvigorating and Empowering the Biomedical Community.

2009

Decision Making in T1 Translational Research

February 10, 2009 to February 11, 2009

The purpose of this workshop was to identify common problems encountered during the practice of T1 translational research and potential solutions to those problems. The workshop addressed the following topics: Pathways of T1 transaltional research, use of team science, methods for incorporating advanced technologies and animal models into T1 translation, and the specific needs of early career investigators.

Detection, Impact and Control of Specific Pathogens in Animal Resource Facilities Workshop

April 23, 2009 to April 24, 2009

The purpose of the workshop was to identify current problems and future challenges related to the control, detection, research interpretation and zoonotic potential of emerging and re-emerging pathogens in animal resource facilities, including aquatic models, nonhuman primates (NHP) and rodents.

Workshop on Efficient Management and Utilization of Core Facilities

July 14, 2009 to July 15, 2009

The purpose of this workshop was to discuss the state of existing NIH-funded research core facilities, identify common problems encountered during their operation and use, and raise options to maximize the use and efficiency of core facilities. Based on examples of current use and the session discussions, workshop participants were given the opportunity to propose changes to improve access, administrative management, training, utilization, and quality assurance at core facilities.

Summary of the 2009 National Veterinary Scholars Symposium

August 6, 2009 to August 8, 2009

More than 450 people gathered on the North Carolina State University campus August 6 – August 8 for the 2009 National Veterinary Scholars Symposium. This public-private-partnership — sponsored in part by NIH, Merck & Co., Inc. and the animal health company Merial, Ltd. — convened veterinary students from schools around the United States and Canada who are engaged in formal research training programs. The focus this year was "Translational Research: Putting Discoveries to Work in Practice."

2008

Report of the Chimpanzee Sanctuary Working Group

May 5, 2008

This final report summarizes a meeting of the Chimpanzee Sanctuary Working Group held in Bethesda, Maryland on Monday, May 5, 2008. The purpose of the meeting was to provide expert input to the National Advisory Research Resources Council on specific issues related to the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)/National Institutes of Health (NIH) oversight of the federally supported National Chimpanzee Sanctuary.

Summary of Chimp Haven Visit and Meeting with the Chimpanzee Sanctuary Working Group and the Chimp Haven Board of Directors

July 8, 2008

On July 8, 2008, the Chimpanzee Sanctuary Working Group toured the Chimp Haven facility with the Chimp Haven staff and Board of Directors. The tour was comprehensive, and all of the facilities were visited — though it did not include entering the interior housing areas.

Summary of the 2008 National Veterinary Scholars Symposium

July 31, 2008 to August 3, 2008

Over 450 people gathered on the Michigan State University campus July 31 – August 3 for the 2008 National Veterinary Scholars Symposium. This symposium — sponsored in part by NIH, Merck & Co., Inc. (a pharmaceutical company), and Merial (an animal health company) — brought together veterinary students from schools around the United States and Canada who are engaged in formal research programs.

Animal Models: Informatics and Access Meeting

August 19, 2008 to August 20, 2008

Biomedical research is critical for effective resolution of the health issues which negatively impact our world. From both individual and societal perspectives, serious health issues are a profound detrimental influence on quality of life. In addition, treatment of health issues consumes a significant and increasing share of individual and national resources, thereby limiting options to address other issues of societal concern. Taken together, these factors form a substantial motivation to maximize productivity in biomedical research.