Chimpanzee Management Reports

(Chimpanzee Management Reports)

Costs for Maintaining Humane Care and Welfare of Chimpanzees, Oct. 24, 2016

NIH conducts an annual census of its owned and supported chimpanzees after the end of each fiscal year (Sept. 30) to provide the public with official figures on their numbers and cost of care. The total number of animals is expected to decrease annually as a result of normal mortality. For example, the overall mortality rate for Fiscal Year 2016 (FY16) was 5.4%, which is within the expected range. The number of animals at different facilities may also increase or decrease as a result of relocation.

There are two categories of costs associated with the long-term care of chimpanzees owned or supported by NIH: (1) facility construction and (2) chimpanzee care and facility maintenance costs. For any facility, the cost of care per animal per day will decrease as the number of animals increases and vice versa.

Facility Construction Costs

The federally supported chimpanzee population has been decreasing each year since the late 1990s due to a continuing breeding moratorium and natural mortality. A census decrease results in an increase in unused space at all of the NIH-supported facilities and, thus while the need for maintenance still arises there is no near-term need for new construction. There were no significant construction or renovation costs during FY16.

Chimpanzee Care and Welfare

All federally supported chimpanzee facilities (sanctuary and non-sanctuary) comply with local, state and federal laws that regulate animal research and also are certified by the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International and thus provide care that goes above and beyond that required by law. NIH is committed to maintaining the high quality of care and welfare at these facilities.

Since the number of chimpanzees at any facility will change over time, the cost per day per animal at a facility can vary from year to year. These cost per day calculations are useful for monitoring efficiency within a facility but have limited usefulness when comparing across facilities. Costs vary between facilities due to the local economy, size of the chimpanzee population, and the presence of other nonhuman primates where expensive expertise may be shared. Generally, the larger the population at any facility (chimpanzees and other nonhuman primates), the lower the cost per day per animal at that facility; this reflects an economy of scale. In a non-breeding population, the total number of animals will eventually decrease to the point that an economy of scale can no longer be realized at a facility. This can be partially compensated by decreasing staff as the chimpanzee population decreases by a certain percentage (this will vary between facilities). Currently, all animals are beginning to relocate to the Federal Sanctuary at Chimp Haven so NIH expects to see the cost efficiency begin to optimize at Chimp Haven while the efficiency at other facilities will decrease.

Based on the census as of October 24, 2016 and the most recent FY16 awards and payments, NIH spent a total of $9.06 M for 542 animals for an average of $45.8 per day per chimpanzee across all facilities including: 1) the Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research (KCCMR); 2) the Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC); 3) the Alamogordo Primate Facility (APF) and; 4) the Federal Sanctuary facility operated by Chimp Haven, Inc. For FY15 the comparable numbers are a total of $10.19M for 573 animals for an average of $48.77 per day per chimpanzee.

FY16 Funds Provided for NIH Owned and Supported Chimpanzees*

Research Facilities

Facility # of Chimpanzees,
as of 10/24/16
(total)
NIH Cost**,
$M/year
(total)
NIH cost***,
$/animal/day,
(avg)
KCCMR 135 2.61 53.00
SNPRC, P51 81 0.602 20.40
SNPRC, U42 0 NA NA
APF 138 3.00 59.56
Subtotal Eligible for Retirement 354 6.21 48.08
Chimp Haven 188 2.85 41.55
  Total
542
Total
9.06
Overall
45.8

*Definition of owned and supported:

NIH-owned: NIH owns the chimpanzee and funds their cost of care

NIH-supported: chimpanzees are privately owned and NIH funds their cost of care

**Information in the tables is based on data collected at the end of the fiscal year.

***The number of animals and thus the cost per animal per day will vary throughout the year at all facilities.

Cost Determinations

Total Costs per Year for the NIH-Owned or -Supported Chimpanzees

October 31, 2011 report:

  • Total number of animals owned or supported = 713
  • Total cost for FY11 - $11.58M
  • Total cost per animal per day = $44.5

October 23, 2012 report:

  • Total number of animals owned or supported = 669
  • Total cost for FY12 - $12.38M
  • Total cost per animal per day = $50.6

October 27, 2013 report:

  • Total number of animals owned or supported = 644
  • Total cost for FY13 = $9.76M
  • Total cost per animal per day = $41.5

October 27, 2014 report:

  • Total number animals owned or supported = 606
  • Total cost for FY14 = $12.09M
  • Total cost per animal per day = $54.66

October 21, 2015 report

  • Total number of animals owned or supported = 573
  • Total cost for FY15= $10.19M
  • Total cost per animal per day = $48.77

October 24, 2016 report

  • Total number of animals owned or supported = 542
  • Total cost for FY16= $9.06M
  • Total cost per animal per day = $45.8

Current Costs per Facility

KCCMR (U42) - Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research, Bastrop, TX

  • Total cost from Notice of Award (NOA) dated 09/01/2016 - 08/31/2017= $2,609,512

SNPRC (P51) - Southwest National Primate Research Center (Texas Biomedical Research Institute), San Antonio, TX

  • The total cost to NIH for chimpanzee care from NOA dated 05/18/2016 - 04/30/2017 = $602,534.
  • Under the P51, costs are shared between care for the chimpanzees and several thousand other non-human primates.
  • 81chimpanzees are owned by the SNPRC are partially supported with funds from NIH and the remainder provided by the Texas Biomedical Research Institute.

SNPRC (U42) - Southwest National Primate Research Center (Texas Biomedical Research Institute), San Antonio, TX

  • The last of the NIH owned chimpanzees supported under the U42 at SNPRC were relocated to Chimp Haven in May 2016.
  • No additional funds were provided to the SNPRC U42.

APF - Alamogordo Primate Facility, Alamogordo, NM and operated by Charles River Laboratories (a for-profit company) under contract with the NIH.

  • Total cost for the base period under the contract with Charles River Laboratories for period 09/26/2016 - 09/25/2017 = $2,997,563.
  • Chimpanzees at APF began relocating to Chimp Haven in October 2016.

Chimp Haven, Inc. - A not-for-profit company that operates the federal sanctuary in Keithville, LA under contract with the NIH.

  • Total cost under the contract with Chimp Haven, Inc. for period 07/16/2016 - 07/15/2017 = $2,850,977.
Costs for Maintaining Humane Care and Welfare of Chimpanzees, Oct. 21, 2015

NIH conducts an annual census of its owned and supported chimpanzees after the end of each fiscal year (Sept. 30) to provide the public with official figures on their numbers and cost of care. The total number of animals is expected to decrease annually as a result of normal mortality. The number of animals at different facilities may also increase or decrease as a result of relocation. There are two categories of costs associated with the long-term care of chimpanzees owned or supported by NIH: (1) facility construction and (2) chimpanzee care and facility maintenance costs. For any facility, the cost of care per animal per day will decrease as the number of animals increases and vice versa.

Facility Construction Costs

The federally supported chimpanzee population has been decreasing each year since the late 1990s due to a continuing breeding moratorium and natural mortality. The overall mortality rate for 2014-2015 was 5.6%, which is within the expected range. This census decrease has resulted in an increase in unused space at all of the NIH-supported facilities and, thus while the need for maintenance occasionally arises there is no near-term need for new construction; there are approximately 160 spaces available at the current NIH supported facilities. There were no significant construction or renovation costs during FY 2015.

Chimpanzee Care and Welfare

All federally supported chimpanzee facilities (sanctuary and non-sanctuary) not only comply with local, state and federal laws that regulate animal research but also are certified by the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International and thus provide care that goes above and beyond that required by law. NIH is committed to maintaining the high quality of care and welfare at these facilities.

Since the number of chimpanzees at any facility will change over time, the cost per day per animal at a facility can vary from year to year. Also, if grant funds at a facility are not totally expended from the previous year, those funds are used to offset the current year’s cost and the cost per day per animal will appear lower; see TexBiomed U42 funding in the Tables below. These cost per day calculations are useful for monitoring efficiency within a facility but have limited usefulness when comparing across facilities. Costs vary between facilities due to the local economy, size of the chimpanzee population, and the presence of other nonhuman primates where expensive expertise may be shared. Generally, the larger the population at any facility (chimpanzees and other nonhuman primates), the lower the cost per day per animal at that facility; this reflects an economy of scale. In a non-breeding population, the total number of animals will eventually decrease to the point that an economy of scale can no longer be realized at a facility. This can be partially compensated by decreasing staff as the chimpanzee population decreases by a certain percentage (this will vary between facilities). However, over the next several years, even though the total cost of the chimpanzee program will continue to decrease, the efficiency will also decrease with a concomitant and unavoidable increase in the cost per day per animal.

Based on the census as of October 21, 2015 and the most recent FY15 awards and payments, NIH spent a total of $10.19M for 573 animals for an average of $48.77 per day per chimpanzee across all facilities including: 1) the two research facilities, Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research (KCCMR) and the Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC); 2) the Alamogordo Primate Facility (APF) and; 3) the federal sanctuary facility operated by Chimp Haven, Inc. For FY14 the comparable numbers are a total of $12.1M for 606 animals for an average of $54.66 per day per chimpanzee.

FY15 Funds Provided for NIH Owned and Supported Chimpanzees*

Research Facilities

Facility # of Chimpanzees,
as of 10/21/15
(total)
NIH Cost**,
$M/year
(total)
NIH cost***,
$/animal/day,
(avg)
KCCMR 139 2.87 56.57
SNPRC, P51 82 1.4 46.78
SNPRC, U42 20 0 0
Total 241 4.27 48.54

Research Reserve Facility

Facility # of Chimpanzees,
as of 10/21/15
(total)
NIH Cost**,
$M/year
(total)
NIH cost***,
$/animal/day,
(avg)
APF 149 3.16 58.10

Federal Sanctuary

Facility # of Chimpanzees,
as of 10/21/15
(total)
NIH Cost**,
$M/year
(total)
NIH cost***,
$/animal/day,
(avg)
Chimp Haven 183 2.77M 41.47

*Definition of owned and supported:

NIH-owned: NIH owns the chimpanzee and funds their cost of care.

NIH-supported: chimpanzees are privately owned and NIH funds their cost of care.

**Information in the tables is based on data collected at the end of the fiscal year.

***The number of animals and thus the cost per animal per day will very throughout the year at all facilities.

Cost Determinations

Total Costs per Year for the NIH-Owned or -Supported Chimpanzees

October 31, 2011 report:

  • Total number of animals owned or supported = 713
  • Total cost for FY11 - $11.58M
  • Total cost per animal per day = $44.5

October 23, 2012 report:

  • Total number of animals owned or supported = 669
  • Total cost for FY12 - $12.38M
  • Total cost per animal per day = $50.6

October 27, 2013 preliminary report:

  • Total number of animals owned or supported = 644
  • Total cost for FY13 = $9.76M
  • Total cost per animal per day = $41.5

October 27, 2014 report:

  • Total number animals owned or supported = 606
  • Total cost for FY14 = $12.09M
  • Total cost per animal per day = $54.66

October 21, 2015 report

  • Total number of animals owned or supported = 573
  • Total cost for FY15= $10.19M
  • Total cost per animal per day = $48.77

Current Costs per Facility

KCCMR (U42) - Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research, Bastrop, TX

  • Total cost from NOGA dated 09/01/2015 - 08/31/2016= $2,558,344
  • 14 animals previously covered by a Division of Veterinary Resources contract were moved to the KCCMR U42 in FY14. Funds were provided to the U42 on 02/04/2015 to cover the care of these animals = $204,623 in NOGA dated 02/04-2012 – 08/31/2015. 13 animals were transferred to the federal sanctuary between December 2014 and April 2015.
  • Funds to care for the DVR animals remaining at KCCMR were provided as indicated in the NOGA dated 09/04/2015 – 08/31/2016 = $104,313.

SNPRC (P51) - Southwest National Primate Research Center (Texas Biomedical Research Institute), San Antonio, TX

  • This is last year's total cost from NOGA dated 05/01/2015 - 04/30/2016, pro-rated for costs associated with chimpanzees only = $1.4M.
  • Under the P51, costs are shared between care for the chimpanzees and several thousand other non-human primates.
  • 82 chimpanzees are owned by SNPRC and supported with funds from NIH.

SNPRC (U42) - Southwest National Primate Research Center (Texas Biomedical Research Institute), San Antonio, TX

  • Total cost from NOGA dated 08/01/2015 - 07/31/2016 = $1.00.
  • 20 chimpanzees owned and supported by NIH.
  • Unobligated FY14 funds were used to pay the FY 15 costs.

APF - Alamogordo Primate Facility, Alamogordo, NM and operated by Charles River Laboratories (a for-profit company) under contract with the NIH

  • Total cost for the base period on contract HHSN276201400013C for period 09/26/2015 - 09/25/2016 = $3,155,644.
  • Unlike the other facilities, the APF is located on a United States Air Force (USAF) base and thus operates under conditions of the contract between NIH and Charles River Laboratories which includes additional USAF-specific conditions detailed in a permit issued by the USAF.
    • Use Permit No. USAF-ACC-KWRD-4-01-005 states that any chimpanzee designated as surplus must be removed from the APF premises.
    • The same permit states that any chimpanzee removed from APF may not be returned to the APF. Further, no new animals may be introduced into the APF.

Chimp Haven, Inc.– A not-for-profit company that operates the federal sanctuary in Keithville, LA under contract with the NIH

  • Total cost for the contract HHSN268201100065C for period 07/16/2015 - 07/15/2016 = $2,770,269.
  • The Standards of Care for Chimpanzees Held in the Federally Supported Sanctuary System (42 CFR Part 9) and the CHIMP Act govern the activities at Chimp Haven.
  • Space is filled as it becomes available. Chimp Haven received 13 animals from KCCMR between December 2014 and April 2015.
Costs for Maintaining Humane Care and Welfare of Chimpanzees, Oct. 27, 2014

NIH conducts an annual census of its owned and supported chimpanzees after the end of each fiscal year (Sept. 30) to provide the public with official figures on their numbers and cost of care. The total number of animals is expected to decrease annually as a result of normal mortality. The number of animals at different facilities may also increase or decrease as a result of relocation.

There are two categories of costs associated with the long-term care of chimpanzees owned or supported by NIH: (1) facility construction and (2) chimpanzee care and facility maintenance costs. For any facility, the cost of care per animal per day will increase as the number of animals decreases and vice versa.

Facility Construction Costs

The NIH supported chimpanzee facilities are specifically designed to accommodate the large size, strength, and the special behavioral requirements of this population. These living accommodations include indoor housing with air conditioning/heating, special wall furniture, and unrestricted access to large outdoor areas. The federally-supported chimpanzee population has been decreasing each year since the late 1990s due to a breeding moratorium and natural mortality. This census decrease has resulted in an increase in unused space at all of the NIH-supported facilities and, thus while the need for maintenance occasionally arises there is no near-term need for new construction; there are approximately 150 spaces available at the current NIH supported facilities. There were no significant construction or renovation costs during FY 2014.

Chimpanzee Care and Welfare

Based on the census as of October 27, 2014, and the most recent FY14 awards and payments, NIH spent a total of $12.1M for 606 animals for an average of $54.66 per day per chimpanzee across all facilities including: 1) the two research facilities, Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research (KCCMR) and the Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC); 2) the Alamogordo Primate Facility (APF);and 3) the federal sanctuary facility operated by Chimp Haven, Inc. For FY13 the comparable numbers are a total of $9.76M for 644 animals for an average of $41.50 per day per chimpanzee. There appears to be a disproportionately higher cost for fewer animals in FY14. This anomaly resulted from Chimp Haven receiving only a partial award ($744K) in FY 2013 because the cap on chimpanzee funding was not raised until FY 2014 by passage of the CHIMP Act Amendments of 2013. The remainder of the funds that would have been awarded to Chimp Haven in FY 2013 was paid with FY 2014 funds (see Tables and Cost per facility information below).

Since the number of chimpanzees at any facility will change over time, the “cost/day/animal” at that facility will vary over the course of a year. Also, as funds are provided to a facility in anticipation of receiving additional chimpanzees, the cost per day per animal may appear higher for that year; e.g., see the Chimp Haven funding in the Tables below. Conversely, if funds are not totally expended from the previous year, those funds are used to offset the current year’s cost and the cost per day per animal may appear lower; see TexBiomed funding in the Tables.

FY14 Funds Provided for NIH Owned and Supported Chimpanzees*

Research Facilities

Facility # of Chimpanzees,
as of 10/27/14
(total)
NIH Cost**,
$M/year
(total)
NIH cost***,
$/animal/day,
(avg)
KCCMR 156 2.56 44.96
SNPRC, P51 85 1.0 32.23
SNPRC, U42 20 0 0
Total 261 3.56 37.37

Research Reserve Facility

Facility # of Chimpanzees,
as of 10/27/14
(total)
NIH Cost**,
$M/year
(total)
NIH cost***,
$/animal/day,
(avg)
APF 154 4.09 60.36

Federal Sanctuary

Facility # of Chimpanzees, as of 10/27/14
(total)
NIH Cost**,
$M/year
(total)
NIH cost***,
$/animal/day,
(avg)
Chimp Haven 191 4.44M 63.69

*Definition of owned and supported:

  • NIH-owned: NIH owns the chimpanzee and funds their cost of care
  • NIH-supported: chimpanzees are privately owned and NIH funds their cost of care

    **Information in the tables is based on data collected at the end of the fiscal year.

    ***The number of animals and thus the cost per animal per day will very throughout the year at all facilities.

    Cost Determinations

    • Total per Year

      October 31, 2011 report:

      • Total number of animals owned or supported = 713
      • Total cost per year - $11.58M
      • Total cost per animal per day = $44.5

      October 23, 2012 report:

      • Total number of animals owned or supported = 669
      • Total cost per year - $12.38M
      • Total cost per animal per day = $50.6

      October, 2013 preliminary report:

      • Total number of animals owned or supported = 644
      • Total cost per year FY13 = $9.76M
      • Total cost per animal per day = $41.5

      October 27, 2014 report:

      • Total number animals owned or supported = 606
      • Total cost per year = $12.09M
      • Total cost per animal per day = $54.66
      Cost per Facility

      KCCMR (U42) - Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research, Bastrop, TX

      • Total cost from Notice of Grant Award (NOGA) dated 09/01/2014 - 08/31/2015= $2,560,584
      • 14 animals previously covered by a NIH Division of Veterinary Resources contract are now covered under the grant above at no additional FY14 dollars.

      SNPRC (P51) - Southwest National Primate Research Center (Texas Biomedical Research Institute), San Antonio, TX

      • This is last year's total cost from NOGA dated 05/01/2014 - 04/30/2015, pro-rated for costs associated with chimpanzees only = $1.0M.
      • Under the P51, costs are shared between care for the chimpanzees and several thousand other non-human primates.
      • 85 chimpanzees are owned by SNPRC and supported with funds from NIH.

      SNPRC (U42) - Southwest National Primate Research Center (Texas Biomedical Research Institute), San Antonio, TX

      • Total cost from NOGA dated 08/01/2014 - 07/31/2015 = $1.00.
      • 20 chimpanzees owned and supported by NIH.
      • Unobligated FY13 funds were used to pay the FY 14 costs.

      APF - Alamogordo Primate Facility, Alamogordo, NM

      • Cost to extend the previous contract from 06/30/2014 to 09/25/2014 = $934,984.
      • Total cost for the base period on contract HHSN276201400013CC for period 09/26/2014 - 09/25/2015 = $3,150,452.
      • Unlike the other facilities, the APF does not have an active chimpanzee research program; no invasive research is conducted on these chimpanzees while on the premises. According to contract solicitation NHLBI-CSB-(RR)-SS-2011-264-KJM (HHS, 2011c), the current agreements between the NIH and the U.S. Air Force (USAF) prescribe that no invasive research shall be conducted on chimpanzees currently held at the APF.
      • Use Permit No. USAF-ACC-KWRD-4-01-005 states that any chimpanzee designated as surplus (eligible for retirement) must be immediately removed from the APF premises.
      • The same permit states that any chimpanzee removed from APF for research may not be returned to the APF. Further, no new animals may be introduced into the APF.

      Chimp Haven, Inc. - Operates the federal sanctuary in Keithville, LA

      • Total cost for the contract HHSN268201100065C for period 07/16/2014 - 07/15/2015 = $2,734,593.
      • In January 2014, $1.2M was provided to cover the FY13 short-funding.
      • In April 2014, $504,396 was provided to cover the cost of the additional chimpanzees transferred from the New Iberia Research Center.
      • The Standards of Care for Chimpanzees Held in the Federally Supported Sanctuary System (42 CFR Part 9) and the CHIMP Act govern the activities at Chimp Haven.
      • Space is filled as it becomes available.
Preliminary Costs for Maintaining Humane Care and Welfare of Chimpanzees, Oct. 27, 2013

NIH conducts an annual census of its owned and supported chimpanzees after the end of each fiscal year (Sept. 30) to provide the public with official figures on their numbers and cost of care. The number of animals is expected to decrease annually as a result of normal mortality.

There are two types of costs associated with the long-term care of chimpanzees owned or supported by NIH: appropriate facility construction and chimpanzee care and welfare costs.

Facility Construction Costs

Chimpanzee facilities are uniquely designed for these large animals, including indoor housing with air conditioning/heating, special wall furniture, and outdoor housing tailored to chimpanzee size and behavior. In 2002-2004 NIH spent approximately $11.8 million to construct a federal sanctuary system operated by Chimp Haven, Inc. to appropriately house 130 federally owned chimpanzees over their life time. Approximately $2 million was provided to the Texas Biomedical Research Institute in September 2010 to renovate facilities to increase the capacity of the Southwest National Primate Research Center.

Chimpanzee Care and Welfare

Based on the most recent awards and payments, NIH is spending an average of $44.50 per day per chimpanzee in research facilities; $61.3 per day per chimpanzee in the research reserve at Alamogordo Primate Facility (APF); and $42.70 per day per chimpanzee in the federal sanctuary facility operated by Chimp Haven, Inc. See Tables for detailed figures.

FY13 Funds Provided for NIH-Owned and -Supported Chimpanzees

Research Facilities (Preliminary)

Facility # of Chimpanzees,
as of 10/27/13
(total)
NIH Cost**,
$M/year
(total)
NIH cost***,
$/animal/day
(avg)
NIRC 59 1.01 46.7
KCCMR 147 2.44 46.4
KCCMR, DVR 16 .4 68.8
SNPRC, P51 89 .92 28.2
SNPRC, U42 22 .65 80.9
Total (333) (5.42) (44.5)

Research Reserve Facility (Preliminary)

Facility # of Chimpanzees,
as of 10/27/13
(total)
NIH Cost**,
$M/year
(total)
NIH cost***,
$/animal/day,
(avg)
APF 162 3.60 61.3

Federal Sanctuary

Facility # of Chimpanzees,
as of 10/27/13
(total)
NIH Cost**,
$M/year
(total)
NIH cost***,
$/animal/day,
(avg)
Chimp Haven 149 .7441 42.71

1Funds provided to last approximately 4 months at a spend rate of $190,000 per month. See explanation below in Cost Determinations.

*Definition of owned and supported:

  • NIH-owned: NIH owns the chimpanzee and funds their cost of care
  • NIH-supported: chimpanzees are privately owned and NIH funds their cost of care

**Cost Determinations

***Information in the tables is based on data collected at the end of the fiscal year. The number of animals and thus the cost per animal per day will very throughout the year at all facilities.

April 15, 2011 report:

  • Total number animals owned or supported = 734
  • Total cost per year = $11.81M
  • Total cost per animal per day = $44.1

October 31, 2011 report:

  • Total number of animals owned or supported = 713
  • Total cost per year - $11.58M
  • Total cost per animal per day = $44.5

October 23, 2012 report:

  • Total number of animals owned or supported = 669
  • Total cost per year - $12.38M
  • Total cost per animal per day = $50.6

October, 2013 preliminary report:

  • Total number of animals owned or supported = 644
  • Total cost per year
  • Total cost per animal per day

NIRC - New Iberia Research Center, Lafayette, LA

  • Total cost from NOGA dated 09/16/2013 - 09/15/2014= $1,006,169
  • All NIH-owned NIRC chimpanzees are permanently ineligible for biomedical research.

KCCMR - Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research, Bastrop, TX

  • Total cost from NOGA dated 09/01/2013 - 08/31/2014= $2,437,039
  • Total cost for Division of Veterinary Resources (DVR) base contract HHSN263201200075I for period 8/7/2013 – 8/6/2014 = $401,967.20.

SNPRC (P51) - Southwest National Primate Research Center (Texas Biomedical Research Institute), San Antonio, TX

 

  • This is last year's total cost from NOGA dated 05/01/2012 - 04/30/2013, pro-rated for costs associated with chimpanzees only = $917,305.
  • Most recent numbers are pending from the P51 where costs are shared between care for the chimpanzees and several thousand other non-human primates.
  • 89 chimpanzees are owned by SNPRC and supported with funds from NIH.

SNPRC also owns 26 animals not supported by NIH

SNPRC (U42) - Southwest National Primate Research Center (Texas Biomedical Research Institute), San Antonio, TX

 

  • Total cost from NOGA dated 08/01/2013 - 07/31/2014 = $650,000. 22 chimpanzees owned and supported by NIH.
  • The Tex Biomed cooperative agreement is funded to accommodate the potential influx of the research colony animals described by the Working Group. Until this colony location is determined the actual costs of animals on the cooperative agreement will not be accurate.

APF - Alamogordo Primate Facility, Alamogordo, NM

  • Total cost for first option on contract HHSN268201200068C for period 06/30/2013 - 06/29/2014 = $3,624,969.

Chimp Haven, Inc. – Operates the federal sanctuary in Keithville, LA

  • Total cost for base contract HHSN268201100065C for period 07/16/2013 - 07/15/2014 = $744,000.
  • Funds provided are expected to last approximately 4 months at a spend rate of $190,000 per month.
Archive Costs for Maintaining Humane Care and Welfare of Chimpanzees Oct. 23, 2012

NIH conducts an annual census of its owned and supported chimpanzees after the end of each fiscal year (Sept. 30) to provide the public with official figures on their numbers and cost of care. The number of animals is expected to decrease annually as a result of normal mortality.

There are two types of costs associated with the long-term care of chimpanzees owned or supported by NIH: appropriate facility construction and chimpanzee care and welfare costs.

Facility Construction Costs

Chimpanzee facilities are uniquely designed for these large animals, including indoor housing with air conditioning/heating, special wall furniture, and outdoor housing tailored to chimpanzee size and behavior. In 2002-2004 NIH spent approximately $11.8 million to construct a federal sanctuary system operated by Chimp Haven, Inc. to appropriately house 130 federally owned chimpanzees over their life time. Approximately $2 million was provided to the Texas Biomedical Research Institute in September 2010 to renovate facilities to increase the capacity of the Southwest National Primate Research Center.

Chimpanzee Care and Welfare

Based on the most recent awards and payments, NIH is spending an average of $44 per day per chimpanzee in research facilities; $66 per day per chimpanzee in the research reserve facility at Alamogordo Primate Facility (APF); and $53 per day per chimpanzee in the federal sanctuary facility operated by Chimp Haven, Inc. The average for research facilities becomes $50 per day if the research reserve facility at APF is included. See Tables for detailed figures.

Changes in the Chimpanzee Management Plan since the Last Posting

The last posting, October 31, 2011, reported only those animals owned or supported by the former National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)*. The current posting reports on all animals owned or supported by NIH; this resulted in an increase in reporting of 16 animals owned and supported by the Division of Veterinary Resources (DVR) within the Office of Research Services at NIH. The DVR chimpanzees are housed at the Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research (see Table below).

 

The October 31, 2011 posting reported 125 animals owned by the Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC, Texas Biomedical Research Institute) and supported by NCRR. The current posting reports 91 animals owned by SNPRC and supported by NIH; SNPRC assumed support for the remaining SNPRC-owned animals (see details in Table below). National Primate Research Centers (NPRC) that own chimpanzees can choose to support their privately owned animals with non-federal funds.

On September 21, 2012, the NIH announced that it will be relocating the NIH-owned chimpanzees currently located at the New Iberia Research Center (NIRC) in New Iberia, La. All of the chimpanzees have been declared permanently ineligible for biomedical research and therefore, eligible for retirement. NIH will be retiring as many chimpanzees as can be accommodated by existing capacity within the Federal Sanctuary System and relocate the remainder to the SNPRC, Texas Biomedical Research Institute (Texas Biomed) until space within the Federal Sanctuary System becomes available. Through the existing Texas Biomed cooperative agreement, the NIH provided sufficient funds to support the relocation of chimpanzees to Texas Biomed and to support their care and maintenance once relocated (U42, see Table below). Any excess funds stemming from this award will be used to offset the costs to the NIH of any additional years remaining in the U42.

As of December 2011, no new research using chimpanzees has been funded.

* NCRR ceased to exist after the creation of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) on Dec. 23, 2011. The responsibility for chimpanzees formerly in NCRR’s care now lies with the NIH Division of Program Coordination, Planning, and Strategic Initiatives within the NIH Office of the Director.

Change in Overall Cost to the Government from Previous Reporting Period

October 31, 2011 report:

  • Total number animals owned or supported = 713
  • Total cost per year = $11.58M
  • Total cost per animal per day = $44.5

October 23, 2012 report:

  • Total number of animals owned or supported = 670
  • Total cost per year - $12.38M
  • Total cost per animal per day = $50.6

Cost of NIH-Owned and -Supported* Chimpanzees

Research Facilities

Facility # of Chimpanzees,
as of 10/23/12
(total)
NIH Cost**,
$M/year
(total)
NIH cost***,
$/animal/day,
(avg)
NIRC 110 1.86 46.3
KCCMR 151 2.56 46.5
KCCMR, DVR 16 .39 67.4
SNPRC, P51 91 .92 27.7
SNPRC, U42 24 .52 59.4
Total (392) (6.24) (43.6)

Research Reserve Facility

Facility as of 10/23/12
(total)
NIH Cost**,
$M/year
(total)
NIH cost***,
$/animal/day,
(avg)
APF 169 4.04 65.5

Federal Sanctuary

Facility # of Chimpanzees,
as of 10/23/12
(total)
NIH Cost**,
$M/year
(total)
NIH cost***,
$/animal/day,
(avg)
Chimp Haven 109 2.10 52.8

*Definition of owned and supported:

NIH-owned: NIH owns the chimpanzee and funds their cost of care NIH-supported: chimpanzees are privately owned and NIH funds their cost of care

**Cost determined as below based on most recent 2012 to 2013 Notice of Grant Awards (NOGA) or invoices/obligated funds for contracts with Chimp Haven and APF.

***Information in the tables is based on data collected at the end of the fiscal year. The number of animals and thus the cost per animal per day will very throughout the year at all facilities.

NIRC - New Iberia Research Center, Lafayette, LA

  • Total cost from NOGA dated 09/16/2012 - 09/15/2013= $1,858,987
  • All NIH-owned NIRC chimpanzees are permanently ineligible for biomedical research.

KCCMR - Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research, Bastrop, TX

  • Total cost from NOGA dated 09/01/2012 - 08/31/2013= $2,564,160
  • Total cost for Division of Veterinary Resources (DVR) base contract HHSN263201200075I for period 8/7/2012 – 8/6/2013 = $393,733.

SNPRC (P51) - Southwest National Primate Research Center (Texas Biomedical Research Institute), San Antonio, TX

  • Total cost from NOGA dated 05/01/2012 - 04/30/2013, pro-rated for costs associated with chimpanzees only = $917,305.
  • 91 chimpanzees are owned by SNPRC and supported with funds from NIH.

SNPRC also owns 26 animals not supported by NIH.

SNPRC (U42) - Southwest National Primate Research Center (Texas Biomedical Research Institute), San Antonio, TX

  • Total cost from NOGA dated 09/21/2012 - 07/31/2013= $3,347,851. This includes $523,117 for the current year support and a supplement of $142,850 for partial support of animals in the previous year.
  • 24 chimpanzees owned and supported by NIH.

NOGA also includes $2,681,884 to cover the costs of moving 110 chimpanzees from NIRC and the care and maintenance of the animals as they arrive at the center. These animals are not yet located at SNPRC. This cost does not apply to the 24 animals already at the center.

APF - Alamogordo Primate Facility, Alamogordo, NM

  • Total cost for first option on contract HHSN268201200068C for period 07/16/2012 - 07/15/2013 = $4,037,874.

Chimp Haven, Inc. – Operates the federal sanctuary in Keithville, LA

  • Total cost for base contract HHSN268201100065C for period 06/30/2012 - 06/29/2013 = $2,097,120.
Chimpanzee Management Program (Archived 2013)

The NIH Chimpanzee Management Program (ChiMP) supports long-term, cost-effective housing and maintenance at NIH-supported facilities for chimpanzees. ORIP provides programmatic oversight of the facilities and ensures they comply with the Animal Welfare Act, and policies concerning laboratory animal care and use.

In 1995, a breeding moratorium on NCRR-owned and supported chimpanzees was instituted. Soon after, the Chimpanzee Management Plan Working Group was created to periodically assess the need for chimpanzees in research and to report its findings to the National Advisory Research Resources Council, NCRR's advisory body. The Working Group serves as a fact-finding body that gathers information, analyzes relevant issues and facts, and drafts proposed position papers. The Working Group is comprised of non-government members with a wide range of scientific and non-scientific expertise.

The most recent meeting of the Working Group was held in March 2007 and the Report of the Chimpanzee Management Plan Working Group, (66K PDF, requires free Acrobat Reader Exit Disclaimer), was provided to the National Advisory Research Resources Council on May 22, 2007.

While NCRR acknowledges the continuing importance of chimpanzees to biomedical research, it also recognizes the fiduciary responsibilities it has to maintain the health and well-being of the chimpanzees already in its care. Since chimpanzees in captivity can live 50 years or more, high-quality care for just one animal over its lifespan can cost $300,000 to $500,000. In addition to its responsibilities to provide care for the existing chimpanzees owned or supported by NCRR, the Center must also fulfill its budget responsibilities to its other programs and resources, which are critical to the creation and delivery of lifesaving cures and treatments to the American people.

Therefore, after careful review of existing chimpanzee resources, NCRR has determined that it does not have the financial resources to support the breeding of chimpanzees that are owned or supported by NCRR. However, NCRR will continue to honor its commitments to the existing chimpanzee facilities, including the federal sanctuary for chimpanzees that are no longer needed in biomedical research.

Chimpanzee Sanctuary

In September 2002, NCRR announced the award of a contract to Chimp Haven, Inc Exit Disclaimer., a private, nonprofit organization, to establish and operate a chimpanzee sanctuary. The sanctuary will provide lifetime care for federally owned or supported chimpanzees that are no longer needed for biomedical research. Over the term of the 10-year, cost-sharing contract, NCRR will provide approximately $19 million in total costs, and Chimp Haven will contribute approximately $4 million toward direct costs. NCRR also awarded two construction grants, totaling a little over $11.5 million, so that Chimp Haven could develop and build the state-of-the-art facility. A sanctuary system to provide lifetime care of retired research chimpanzees was mandated by the Chimpanzees Health Improvement, Maintenance, and Protection (CHIMP) Act of December 2000.

In addition, NCRR has issued standards to implement provisions of the CHIMP Act, which authorized the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services to develop and publish standards of care for chimpanzees held in the sanctuary system. The standards apply to only those facilities receiving funds as a part of the federally-funded chimpanzee sanctuary system.

October 10, 2008, Federal Register Notice: Standards of Care for Chimpanzees Held in the Federally Supported Chimpanzee System (183K PDF).

On July 8, 2008, the Chimpanzee Sanctuary Working Group toured the Chimp Haven facility with the Chimp Haven staff and Board of Directors. Following the tour, the Working Group and NIH staff met to review the on-site information provided by Chimp Haven. The Chimpanzee Sanctuary Working Group prepared a summary that was provided to the National Advisory Research Resources Council on September 16, 2008.

Contact Information

For further information, contact:

Harold Watson, Ph.D.
Program Officer
Division of Comparative Medicine
Office of Research Infrastructure Programs
Division of Program Coordination, Planning, and Strategic Initiatives
Office of the Director
National Institutes of Health
One Democracy Plaza
6701 Democracy Boulevard, MSC 4874
Bethesda, Maryland 20892-4874 (20817 for express mail)
Phone: 301-435-0744
Fax: 301-480-3819
E-mail: Harold Watson

Statement on Relocation of NIH Chimpanzees at New Iberia Research Center

Update (December 17, 2012): NIH issued the following announcement on its plans to move all of its chimpanzees from the New Iberia Research Center directly to the Federal Sanctuary System: http://www.nih.gov/news/health/dec2012/od-18.htm

December 3, 2012: Since the September 21, 2012, statement below, NIH has been collaborating extensively with Chimp Haven, NIRC, and other organizations that care about chimpanzees to identify the maximum number of chimpanzees that can go directly into the Federal Sanctuary System within the current funding and time constraints and taking into consideration the health of each individual chimpanzee. The process of relocating these chimpanzees will take time and care to ensure their continued well-being. NIH will continue to update the community as these numbers are finalized. NIH’s goal is to retire all 110 of its research-ineligible chimpanzees into the sanctuary as soon as possible.

September 21, 2012: The NIH today announced that it will be relocating the NIH-owned chimpanzees currently located at the New Iberia Research Center (NIRC) in New Iberia, La., because NIH funding to the facility will end in September 2013. This circumstance, combined with NIH’s anticipation that there will be a substantial reduction in the number of chimpanzees needed for research that meets the Institute of Medicine (IOM) criteria, prompted NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., to designate all of these chimpanzees permanently ineligible for biomedical research. As of that date, there were 110 NIH-owned chimpanzees at NIRC.

Approximately 10 to 20 of the chimpanzees will be relocated to the federally supported chimpanzee sanctuary operated by Chimp Haven, Inc. in Keithsville, La., which would put Chimp Haven at or near full occupancy. NIH is continuing to evaluate options to move additional animals to Chimp Haven. It is expected that the remaining chimpanzees will be relocated to the Texas Biomedical Research Institute in San Antonio, Tx. Texas Biomedical has the specialized resources, experience, capacity, and funding mechanism to provide continued high-quality care for the chimpanzees. The animals being relocated to Texas Biomedical are considered permanently ineligible for biomedical research and therefore are retirement eligible. Relocation of the chimpanzees will be conducted on a timescale that will allow for optimal transition of each individual chimpanzee with careful consideration of their welfare, including their health and social grouping.

NIH will continue to keep the community informed throughout this transition which is expected to occur over several months.