Strategic Planning for Research Infrastructure Requirements: Models of Human Disease

Office of Research Infrastructure Programs (ORIP) Strategic Planning Conference

Strategic Planning for Research Infrastructure Requirements: Models of Human Disease

6001 Executive Boulevard, Room A1/A2, Rockville, MD 20852

July 8, 2015

Conveners - T Magnuson, K Reimann

Time Event Presenters
7:30 - 8:00 am Registration
8:00 - 8:15 am

Welcome & Plan

8:15 - 9:45 am

Panel 1
ORIP Resources and Emerging Opportunities in Biomedical Research

Chair: C MacRae

Panelists: H Bellen, G FitzGerald, J Levine, D Prockop, R Tanguay, L Zon

9:45 - 11:15 am

Panel 2
ORIP Strategic Planning Conference July 8, 2015 | DPCPSI

Chair: K Lloyd

Panelists: R Adams, P Johnson, C Pinkert, J Postlethwait, F Villinger, R Walter

11:15 - 11:30 am Break
11:30 - 12:30 am

Panel 3
Animal Models in Biomedical Research II (Rodents, Aquatics, Invertebrates)

Chair: E Bryda

Panelists: R Adams, P Johnson, C Pinkert, J Postlethwait, F Villinger, R Walter

12:30 am - 1:30 pm

Lunch

1:30 - 2:30 pm

Panel 4
Disease Model Information Management

Chair: E Brown

Panelists: K Cheng, E Engelhard, J Stamatoyannopoulos, M Tyers, M Westerfield

2:30 - 2:45 pm Break
2:45 - 3:15 pm Summation and Farewell

Panel 1: ORIP Resources and Emerging Opportunities in Biomedical Research

Chair: C MacRae

Panelists: H Bellen, G FitzGerald, J Levine, D Prockop, R Tanguay, L Zon

Discussion Topics:

  1. Given the goal of accelerating translational medicine, including precision medicine, what are the major challenges and opportunities? What is the optimal role for ORIP to play in the large trans-NIH initiatives, such as BRAIN and the Undiagnosed Diseases Network?
  2. How can ORIP help to advance “-omics” research in animal models that parallels similar research in human patients (including the development of databases that integrate animal and human data)?
  3. How can ORIP validate animal models, provide gold standard models for given research communities, and advance the NIH scientific rigor and reproducibility initiative?
  4. What services and functions should ORIP resources provide to the biomedical community in addition to animals themselves, e.g., screening assays, phenotyping, and genotyping? How would these vary by type of animal model?
  5. Should ORIP attempt to balance its portfolio between whole animal models and approaches that do not involve intact animals such as cellular systems and “tissues on a chip”?

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Panel 2: Animal Models in Biomedical Research I (Mice, NHP, Fish)

Chair: K Lloyd

Panelists: R Adams, P Johnson, C Pinkert, J Postlethwait, F Villinger, R Walter

Discussion Topics:

  1. How can ORIP best improve the generation, preservation, and distribution of mouse, NHP, and fish models? What are the potential interactions/ synergies that might be identified between these models?
  2. How should ORIP address the challenges, and capitalize on the opportunities, for mouse, NHP, and fish models to become precise and predictive models of human pathologies? What will the next generation models utilizing these species potentially accomplish?
  3. How will ORIP supported resources be affected by the current breakthroughs in technologies for generating and modifying animal genomes? How should such resources be kept relevant and up-to-date?
  4. How can ORIP identify scientific areas and emerging fields within biomedical research that would benefit from access to mouse, NHP, and fish models? What are the emerging gaps that would be addressed by supporting well-characterized mouse, NHP, and fish models?
  5. What are the major challenges for maintaining the viability and utility of ORIP supported mouse, NHP, and fish resource centers for the research community? What can ORIP do to prioritize these resources (given the reality of relatively flat NIH budgets)?
  6. What new directions regarding research or infrastructure/husbandry are expected during the next five years relative to mouse, NHP, and fish models?  How can ORIP help its resources capitalize on these new opportunities?

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Panel 3: Animal Models in Biomedical Research II (Rodents, Aquatics, Invertebrates)

Chair: E Bryda

Panelists: H Bellen, T Clark, S Green, L Maggio-Price, R Sartor, P Sternberg

Discussion Topics:

  1. How can ORIP best use the diverse animal models it supports to meet current research trends/ challenges/ initiatives such as phenomics, BRAIN, precision medicine, microbiome, regenerative medicine, complex inherited disease, environmental health, and reproducibility?
  2. Are there catalytic opportunities for ORIP-supported diverse models in the initiatives identified above?
  3. How can ORIP-supported diverse models advance our understanding of the basic biology and molecular mechanisms of human health and disease to facilitate therapeutic discoveries?
  4. How should ORIP prioritize its support for these endeavors?

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Panel 4: Disease Model Information Management

Chair: E Brown

Panelists: K Cheng, E Engelhard, J Stammatoyannopoulos, M Tyers, M Westerfield

Discussion Topics:

  1. In which technologies should ORIP invest to enable phenotype/genotype/disease comparisons across species?
  2. How can ORIP optimize data curation, handling, and sharing, to best inform selection and use of models of human disease?
  3. Should ORIP advance the training needed to develop, appreciate, and use data management tools in the context of animal models and humans? If so, how should this be accomplished?
  4. How should ORIP establish working partnerships to accomplish all of the above?

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